Posted tagged ‘convenience’

Future Of Car Infotainment Systems

September 28, 2011

Voice enabled GPS devices add another level of sophistication to advance GPS navigation market.

01-ford-fiesta-gps enabled car-future car infotainment systems

GPS technology has been developed for military use.The global navigation of naval warships, missiles guidance and movements of troops on the ground has led to the need for advice site precision technology has finally found a strong market for private users and consumers as well. In fact, you can find GPS devices everywhere.


01-audi_mmi_navigation_plus-road to the future

Navigation devices have been recent improvements in the size of the screen, precision and live traffic reports. However, just as the market of cellular telephony, the need for improving the safety and convenience became a priority more than people began to GPS devices in their vehicles. Demand for models activated voice GPS has grown year after year. Hands-free operation was the next logical to include functionality.

Here I posted next generation Ford Fiesta Car Infotainment systems.

The Web Enabled Browser receives the Google Map to the GPS devices when the driver given the street information to voice activated Bluetooth Device. Then the GPS shows the accurate map to the user. If you want navigation which tells the route accurately. So driving made easily. This is the future of driving.

01-gps navigation-road mate-road map

Turbo-Charger

September 28, 2011

01-twin turbo-supercharger and turbo

A turbocharger is actually a type of supercharger. Originally, the turbocharger was called a “turbo super charger.” Obviously, the name was shortened out of convenience.

01-Twincharger_theory-turbocharger layout diagram

A turbocharger’s purpose is to compress the oxygen entering a car’s engine, increasing the amount of oxygen that enters and thereby increasing the power output. Unlike the belt-driven supercharger that is normally thought of when one hears the word “supercharger,” the turbocharger is powered by the car’s own exhaust gases. In other words, a turbocharger takes a by-product of the engine that would otherwise be useless, and uses it to increase the car’s horsepower.

01-turbo-parts-turbocharger section-compressor air discharge

Cars without a turbocharger or supercharger are called normally aspirated. Normally aspirated cars draw air into the engine through an air filter; the air then passes through a meter, which monitors and regulates the amount of air that enters the system. The air is then delivered to the engine’s combustion chambers, along with a controlled amount of fuel from the carburetor or fuel injectors.

In a turbocharged engine, however, the air is compressed so that more oxygen will fit in the combustion chamber, dramatically increasing the burning power of the engine. The turbocharger is composed of two main parts: the compressor, which compresses the air in the intake; and the turbine, which draws the exhaust gases and uses them to power the compressor. Another commonly used term in relation to turbochargers is boost, which refers to the amount of pressure the air in the intake is subjected to; in other words, the more compressed the air is, the higher the boost.

Although the increase in power is advantageous to the car — and likely a source of enjoyment for the driver — a turbocharger has its drawbacks. First and foremost, a turbocharged engine must have a lower compression ratio than a normally aspirated engine. For this reason, one cannot simply put a turbocharger on an engine that was intended for normal aspiration without seriously undermining the life and performance of the engine. Also, a lower compression ratio means the engine will run less efficiently at low power.

Another major drawback of a turbocharger is the phenomenon known as turbo lag. Because the turbocharger runs on exhaust gases, the turbine requires a build-up of exhaust before it can power the compressor; this means that the engine must pick up speed before the turbocharger can kick in. Additionally, the inlet air grows hotter as it is compressed, reducing its density, and thereby its efficiency in the combustion chamber; a radiator-like device called an intercooler is often used to counter this effect in turbocharged engines.