Posted tagged ‘cycle’

FMEA

August 23, 2011

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Failure Mode – A particular way in which an item fails, independent of the reason for failure.

 Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) – A procedure by which each credible failure mode of each item from a low indenture level to the highest is analyzed to determine the effects on the system and to classify each potential failure mode in accordance with the severity of its effect.

Indenture Levels – The hierarchy of hardware levels from the part to the component to the subsystem to the system, etc.

Redundancy – More than one independent means of performing a function.  There are different kinds of redundancy, including:
(1) Operational – Redundant items, all of which are energized during the operating cycle; includes load-sharing, wherein redundant items are connected in a manner such that upon failure of one item, the other will continue to perform the function.  It is not necessary to switch out the failed item or switch in the redundant one.

            (2) Standby – Items that are inoperative (have no power applied) until they are switched in upon failure of the primary item.

            (3) Like Redundancy – Identical items performing the same function.

            (4) Unlike Redundancy – Non identical items performing the same function

THE FMEA PROCESS

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  • Define the system to be analyzed.  A complete system definition includes identification of internal and interface functions, expected performance at all indenture levels, system restraints, and failure definitions.  Also state systems and mission phases not analyzed giving rationale for the omissions.

  • Indicate the depth of the analysis by identifying the indenture level at which the analysis is begun.

  • Identify specific design requirements that are to be verified by the FMEA.

  • Define ground rules and assumptions on which the analysis is based.  Identify mission phases to be analyzed and the status of equipment during each mission phase.

  • Obtain or construct functional and reliability block diagrams indicating interrelationships of functional groups, system operation, independent data channels, and backup or workaround features of the system.

  • Identify failure modes, effects, failure detection and workaround features and other pertinent information on the worksheet.

  • Evaluate the severity of each failure effect in accordance with the prescribed severity categories.

FMEA Flow Diagram:

01-FMEA FLOW DIAGRAM-STEPS-PREVENTIVE ACTION-CORRECTIVE ACTION

History:

The FMECA was originally developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to improve and verify the reliability of space program hardware.

FMECA Flow Diagram: ( Failure Mode, Effects and Criticality Analysis )

01-FMECA Flow Diagram- Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis

Criticality Analysis Flow:

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Who is the Team ?

 

Areas to be represented are:

  • Quality
  • Logistics
  • Engineering
  • Purchasing
  • Manufacturing
  • Sales
  • Tooling
  • Marketing
  • Customer
  • Supplier

HOW FUEL CELL WORK?

August 23, 2011

An electrochemical reaction occurs between hydrogen and oxygen that converts chemical energy into electrical energy.

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Think of them as big batteries, but ones that only operate when fuel—in this case, pure hydrogen—is supplied to them. When it is, an electrochemical reaction takes place between the hydrogen and oxygen that directly converts chemical energy into electrical energy. Various types of fuel cells exist, but the one automakers are primarily focusing on for fuel cell cars is one that relies on a proton-exchange membrane, or PEM. In the generic PEM fuel cell pictured here, the membrane lies sandwiched between a positively charged electrode (the cathode) and a negatively charged electrode (the anode). In the simple reaction that occurs here rests the hope of engineers, policymakers, and ordinary citizens that someday we’ll drive entirely pollution-free cars.

Here’s what happens in the fuel cell: When hydrogen gas pumped from the fuel tanks arrives at the anode, which is made of platinum, the platinum catalyzes a reaction that ionizes the gas. Ionization breaks the hydrogen atom down into its positive ions (hydrogen protons) and negative ions (electrons). Both types of ions are naturally drawn to the cathode situated on the other side of the membrane, but only the protons can pass through the membrane (hence the name “proton-exchange”). The electrons are forced to go around the PEM, and along the way they are shunted through a circuit, generating the electricity that runs the car’s systems.

Using the two different routes, the hydrogen protons and the electrons quickly reach the cathode. While hydrogen is fed to the anode, oxygen is fed to the cathode, where a catalyst creates oxygen ions. The arriving hydrogen protons and electrons bond with these oxygen ions, creating the two “waste products” of the reaction—water vapor and heat. Some of the water vapor gets recycled for use in humidification, and the rest drips out of the tailpipe as “exhaust.” This cycle proceeds continuously as long as the car is powered up and in motion; when it’s idling, output from the fuel cell is shut off to conserve fuel, and the ultra capacitor takes over to power air conditioning and other components.

A single hydrogen fuel cell delivers a low voltage, so manufacturers “stack” fuel cells together in a series, as in a dry-cell battery. The more layers, the higher the voltage. Electrical current, meanwhile, has to do with surface area. The greater the surface area of the electrodes, the greater the current. One of the great challenges automakers face is how to increase electrical output (voltage times current) to the point where consumers get the power and distance they’re accustomed to while also economizing space in the tight confines of an automobile.

PRODUCE ELECTRICITY FROM SOLAR HEAT

August 22, 2011

01-solar thermal power conversion-beam radiation-direct normal irradiation-Solar-Power-in-Florida-turning solar heat into electricity

The principles of solar thermal power conversion have been known for more than a century; its commercial scale-up and exploitation, however, has only taken place since the mid 1980s. With these first large-scale 30-80 MW parabolic trough power stations, built in the California Mojave desert, the technology has impressively demonstrated its technological and economic promise. With few adverse environmental impacts and a massive resource, the sun, it offers an opportunity to the countries in the sun belt of the world comparable to that currently being offered by offshore wind farms to European and other nations with the windiest shorelines.

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Solar thermal power can only use direct sunlight, called ‘beam radiation’ or Direct Normal Irradiation (DNI), i.e. that fraction of sunlight which is not deviated by clouds, fumes or dust in the atmosphere and that reaches the earth’s surface in parallel beams for concentration. Hence, it must be sited in regions with high direct solar radiation. Suitable sites should receive at least 2,000 kilowatt hours (kWh) of sunlight radiation per m2annually, whilst best site locations receive more than 2,800 kWh/m2/year.

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In many regions of the world, one square kilometer of land is enough to generate as much as 100-130 Giga watt hours (GWh) of solar electricity per year using solar thermal technology. This is equivalent to the annual production of a 50 MW conventional coal- or gas-fired mid-load power plants. Over the total life cycle of a solar thermal power system, its output would be equivalent to the energy contained in more than    5 million barrels of oil2).

TURNING SOLAR HEAT INTO ELECTRICITY

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Producing electricity from the energy in the sun’s rays is a straightforward process: direct solar radiation can be concentrated and collected by a range of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies to provide medium- to high temperature heat.


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This heat is then used to operate a conventional power cycle, for example through a steam turbine or a Stirling engine. Solar heat collected during the day can also be stored in liquid or solid media such as molten salts, ceramics, concrete or, in the future, phase-changing salt mixtures. At night, it can be extracted from the storage medium thereby continuing turbine operation.

MECHANICAL ENGG QUESTIONS-2

August 22, 2011

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  • Different between technology & engineering?

Engineering is application of science. Technology shows various methods of Engineering. A bridge can be made by using beams to bear the load,by an arc or by hanging in a cable; all shows different technology but comes under civil engineering and science applied is laws of force/load distribution.

  • how a diesel engine works in generator?

Diesel engine is a prime mover,for a generator,pump,and for vehicles etc.generator is connected to engine by shaft.mostly in thermal power plat ,there is an engine is used to drive generator to generate power.

  • WHAT IS THE OTHER NAME OF MICROMETER & VERNIER CALLIPER

Micrometer’s other name is Screw Gauze & Vernier caliper’s other name is slide caliper.

  • What is flashpoint?

Flash point: the lowest temperature at which the vapor of a combustible liquid can be ignited in air.

  • what is basic difference between impulse turbine and reaction turbine?

In impulse turbine, jet is used to create impulse on blades
which rotates the turbine and in reaction turbine, no jet
is used pressure energy is converted into kinetic energy.

In impulse turbine fluid enter& leave with same energy ,but in reaction turbine fluid enter with pressure energy&
leaves with kinetic energy

In impulse turbine all the pressure drops in nozzle only &
in reaction turbine pressure drops both fixed & moving
blades.the difference is due to blade profiles.

  • What is the need for drafting?

Drafting is the allowance give to casting process.it also used to remove the casting from mould without damage of
corners.

  • what is the difference between BSP thread and BSW thread?

The British Standard Pipe thread (BSP thread) is a family
of standard screw thread types that has been adopted
internationally for interconnecting and sealing pipe ends
by mating an external (male) with an internal (female) thread.
British Standard Whitworth (BSW) is one of a number of
imperial unit based screw thread standards which use the
same bolt heads and nut hexagonal sizes.

  • What is refrigerant?

Any substance that transfers heat from one place to another,
creating a cooling effect. water is the refrigerant in absorption machines.

  • The amount of carbon present in Cast Iron

Carbon is basically present in the form of cementite in cast iron.Its percentage lies in the range of 2.03-6.67(% by weight of cementite for Cast Iron.If the amount is less than the above range than it is stainless steel.

  • What are the loads considered when designing the Nut and Bolts?

Shear Loads & crushing loads

  • what is the effect of reheat on rankine cycle? 1.efficiency increases 2.work output increases 3. both 4. none of these.

1.Efficiency increases.

this prevents the vapor from condensing during its expansion which can seriously damage the turbine blades, and improves the efficiency of the cycle, as more of the heat flow into the cycle occurs at higher temperature.

MECHANICAL ENGG QUESTIONS

August 22, 2011

1. What is the importance of the Thermodynamics in the field of Mechanical Engineering?
All the mechanical engineering systems are studied with the help of thermodynamics. Hence it is very important for the mechanical engineers.

2. How many Laws of Thermodynamics are there?
There are three laws of the thermodynamics.

First Law: Energy can be neither created nor destroyed. It can only change forms.In any process in an isolated system, the total energy remains the same.


Second Law: When two isolated systems in separate but nearby regions of space, each in thermodynamic equilibrium in itself, but not in equilibrium with each other at first, are at some time allowed to interact, breaking the isolation that separates the two systems, and they exchange matter or energy, they will eventually reach a mutual thermodynamic equilibrium. The sum of the entropies of the initial, isolated systems is less than or equal to the entropy of the final exchanging systems. In the process of reaching a new thermodynamic equilibrium, entropy has increased, or at least has not decreased.

Third Law: As temperature approaches absolute zero, the entropy of a system approaches a minimum.

3. State Laws of conservation of energy?
According to the laws of conservation of energy, “energy can neither be created nor be destroyed. It can only be transformed from one form to another.”

4. Is the boiler a closed system?
Yes definitely the boiler is a closed system.

5. What is Carnot engine?
It was being designed by Carnot and let me tell you that Carnot engine is an imaginary engine which follows the Carnot cycle and provides 100% efficiency.

6. Which formula forms a link between the Thermodynamics and Electro chemistry?
Gibbs Helmholtz formula is the formula which forms the link between the thermodynamics and electromagnetism.

∆Hs/R = [∂ lnp /∂ (1/T)]x

where: x – mole fraction of CO2 in the liquid phase
p – CO2 partial pressure (kPa)
T – temperature (K)
R – universal gas constant
α – mole ratio in the liquid phase (mole CO2 per mole of amine)

7. Which is the hardest compound known?
Diamond.

8. What is Hess Law?
According to the Hess law the energy transfer is simply independent of the path being followed. If the reactant and the product of the whole process are the same then same amount of energy will be dissipated or absorbed.


9. Which has more efficiency: Diesel engine or Petrol engines?
Off course Diesel engine has the better efficiency out of two.