Posted tagged ‘system’

CONVEYOR

August 23, 2011

Conveyor Take-up Arrangement:

01-belt conveyor-take up arrangement-screw take up-take up pulley-automatic take up device-fixed take up device-manual take up-self adjusting take up devices


All belt conveyors require the use of some form of take-up device for the following reasons:

  • To ensure adequate tension of the belt leaving the drive pulley so as to avoid any slippage of the belt
  • To ensure proper belt tension at the loading and other points along the conveyor
  • To compensate for changes in belt length due to elongation
  • To provide extra length of belt when necessary for splicing purpose.

Usually there are two types of take up arrangements.

  • Fixed take up device that may be adjusted periodically by manual operation
  • Automatic take up devices for constant load type

In a screw take up system the take up pulley rotates in two bearing blocks which may slide on stationery guide ways with the help of two screws. The tension is created by the two screws which are tightened and periodically adjusted with a spanner. It is preferable to use screws with trapezoidal thread t decrease the effort required to tighten the belt.

01-hydraulic take up device-pneumatic take up device-electrical take up device-self adjusting take up device-automatic take up device

The main problem with the use of manual take-up is that it requires a vigilant and careful operator to observe when take up adjustment is required. Perfect tension adjustment with this system is also not possible. For this reason these devices are used only in case of short conveyors of up 60 m length and light duty.

In automatic take up arrangement the take up pulley is mounted on slides or on a trolley which is pulled backwards by means of a steel rope and deflecting pulleys. The carriage travels on guide ways mounted parallel to the longitudinal axis of the conveyor, i.e., horizontally in horizontal conveyors and at an incline in inclined conveyors. Hydraulic, pneumatic and electrical take up devices are also used.

Automatic take-up has the following features:

  • It is self adjusting and automatic
  • Greater take-up movement is possible.

HYDRATION SYSTEM

August 23, 2011

04-The Future Of Bicycling Hydration, Bicycle Mounted Hydration System, Hydration System Mounts On The Bicycle Rear

Is it possible to drink too much water during ride without stop the vehicle?

Adequate hydration is as important as calorie replacement to an athlete’s performance, yet dehydration continues to be a condition many experience. This is especially true in cycling where evaporative losses are significant and can go unnoticed. Sweat production and losses through breathing can exceed 2 quarts per hour. To maximize your performance pre-hydration is important, and it is essential that fluid replacement begin early and continue throughout a ride.

Approximately 75% of the energy your body produces is converted to heat rather than being delivered to your muscles to power your pedal stroke. Keeping your body cool and re-hydrated during exertion will result in greater efficiency, higher power output, extended endurance, and a quicker, more thorough recovery. Say good-bye to the Wet Spot!


Individual fluid and electrolyte needs are widely variable during physical exercise due to differences in metabolic rate, body mass and size, environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, humidity, wind, solar load, clothing worn), heat acclimatization status, physical fitness, activity duration, and genetic variability. Sweat rates can vary from 0.5L/hr to more than 3 L/hr. Similarly, sodium concentration may vary from less than 460 mg/L to more than 1840 mg/L

03-The Future Of Bicycling Hydration, Bicycle Mounted Hydration System, Hydration System Mounts On The Bicycle Rear

Technology:

Why use a perfectly good water bottle on your bike when you could use a complex, expensive and awkward to use “hydration system” instead? That’s the promise of the VelEau Bicycle Mounted Hydration System.

01-The Future Of Bicycling Hydration, Bicycle Mounted Hydration System, Hydration System Mounts On The Bicycle Rear

The VelEau comes in several parts. First, there’s a saddlebag which holds 42 ounces (1.4 liters) of water. Then there’s a tube through which you drink, much like those found on CamelBak water bags. This runs from under the seat, along the top-tube to the handlebars, where it is secured to a retracting cord on the stem. This cord pulls the mouthpiece back into place when you’re done drinking, where it is secured by magnets.

02-The Future Of Bicycling Hydration, Bicycle Mounted Hydration System, Hydration System Mounts On The Bicycle Rear

If that seems like it’s complex, unnecessarily heavy and annoying to use, that’s because it probably is. However, there is at least a compartment to carry a multi tool in the same bag, which adds some utility.

HYDRATION SYSTEM

August 23, 2011

04-The Future Of Bicycling Hydration, Bicycle Mounted Hydration System, Hydration System Mounts On The Bicycle Rear

Is it possible to drink too much water during ride without stop the vehicle?

Adequate hydration is as important as calorie replacement to an athlete’s performance, yet dehydration continues to be a condition many experience. This is especially true in cycling where evaporative losses are significant and can go unnoticed. Sweat production and losses through breathing can exceed 2 quarts per hour. To maximize your performance pre-hydration is important, and it is essential that fluid replacement begin early and continue throughout a ride.

Approximately 75% of the energy your body produces is converted to heat rather than being delivered to your muscles to power your pedal stroke. Keeping your body cool and re-hydrated during exertion will result in greater efficiency, higher power output, extended endurance, and a quicker, more thorough recovery. Say good-bye to the Wet Spot!


Individual fluid and electrolyte needs are widely variable during physical exercise due to differences in metabolic rate, body mass and size, environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, humidity, wind, solar load, clothing worn), heat acclimatization status, physical fitness, activity duration, and genetic variability. Sweat rates can vary from 0.5L/hr to more than 3 L/hr. Similarly, sodium concentration may vary from less than 460 mg/L to more than 1840 mg/L

03-The Future Of Bicycling Hydration, Bicycle Mounted Hydration System, Hydration System Mounts On The Bicycle Rear

Technology:

Why use a perfectly good water bottle on your bike when you could use a complex, expensive and awkward to use “hydration system” instead? That’s the promise of the VelEau Bicycle Mounted Hydration System.

01-The Future Of Bicycling Hydration, Bicycle Mounted Hydration System, Hydration System Mounts On The Bicycle Rear

The VelEau comes in several parts. First, there’s a saddlebag which holds 42 ounces (1.4 liters) of water. Then there’s a tube through which you drink, much like those found on CamelBak water bags. This runs from under the seat, along the top-tube to the handlebars, where it is secured to a retracting cord on the stem. This cord pulls the mouthpiece back into place when you’re done drinking, where it is secured by magnets.

02-The Future Of Bicycling Hydration, Bicycle Mounted Hydration System, Hydration System Mounts On The Bicycle Rear

If that seems like it’s complex, unnecessarily heavy and annoying to use, that’s because it probably is. However, there is at least a compartment to carry a multi tool in the same bag, which adds some utility.

MEASUREMENT

August 23, 2011

Calibration:

01-the weighing scale-weighing machines-balance-calibration example

If a known input is given to the measurement system the output deviates from the given input, the corrections are made in the instrument and then the output is measured. This process is called “Calibration”.

Sensitivity:

Sensitivity is the ratio of change in the output signal to the change in the input signal.

Readability:

01-electroniccaliper-VERNIER CALIPER-DIGITAL VERNIER CALIPER-DIRECT MEASUREMENTS-ACCURATE-PRECISION MEASUREMENTS-CALIBRATED INSTRUMENTS-readability

Refers to the ease with which the readings of a measuring instrument can be read.

True size:

Theoretical size of a dimension which is free from errors.

Actual size:

Size obtained through measurement with permissible error.


01-true size-actual size-feet size-example-shoe-footwear

Hysteresis:

All the energy put into the stressed component when loaded is not recovered upon unloading. so the output of measurement partially depends on input called Hysteresis.

01-tachometer-digital tachometer-hysteresis due to pressure of force

Range:

The physical variables that are measured between two values. One is the higher calibration value Hc and the other is Lower value Lc.

01-range - read values from 0 to 11000 rpm - bezel meter - tachometer

Span:

The algebraic difference between higher calibration values to lower calibration values.

Resolution:

The minimum value of the input signal is required to cause an appreciable change in the output known as resolution.

Dead Zone:

It is the largest change in the physical variable to which the measuring instrument does not respond.

Threshold:

The minimum value of input signal that is required to make a change or start from zero.

01-threshold-minimum input given to start the engine-bike kick start action

Backlash:

The maximum distance through which one part of the instrument is moved without disturbing the other part.

01-backlash - continuous rotation possible without applying brake-SINGLE 3-PHASE AC ASYNCHRONOUS ELECTRIC MOTOR

Response Time:

The time at which the instrument begins its response for a change in the measured quantity.

Repeatability:

The ability of the measuring instrument to repeat the same results during the act measurements for the same quantity is known as repeatability.

Bias:

It is a characteristic of a measure or measuring instruments to give indications of the value of a measured quantity for which the average value differs from true value.

Magnification:

It means the magnitude of output signal of measuring instrument many times increases to make it more readable.

01-magnification-objective lens-magnify-loupe-ring

Drift:

If an instrument does not reproduce the same reading at different times of measurement for the same input signal, it is said to be measurement drift.

Reproducibility:

It is the consistency of pattern of variation in measurement. When individual measurements are carried out the closeness of the agreement between the results of measurements of the same quantity.

Uncertainty:

The range about the measured value within the true value of the measured quantity is likely to lie at the stated level of confidence.

Traceability:

It is nothing establishing a calibration by step by step comparison with better standards.

01-traceability-calibration step by step-vacuum calibration

Parallax:

An apparent change in the position of the index relative is to the scale marks.

 

 

01-parallax-error-measurement of length-eye view

MEASUREMENT

August 23, 2011

Calibration:

01-the weighing scale-weighing machines-balance-calibration example

If a known input is given to the measurement system the output deviates from the given input, the corrections are made in the instrument and then the output is measured. This process is called “Calibration”.

Sensitivity:

Sensitivity is the ratio of change in the output signal to the change in the input signal.

Readability:

01-electroniccaliper-VERNIER CALIPER-DIGITAL VERNIER CALIPER-DIRECT MEASUREMENTS-ACCURATE-PRECISION MEASUREMENTS-CALIBRATED INSTRUMENTS-readability

Refers to the ease with which the readings of a measuring instrument can be read.

True size:

Theoretical size of a dimension which is free from errors.

Actual size:

Size obtained through measurement with permissible error.


01-true size-actual size-feet size-example-shoe-footwear

Hysteresis:

All the energy put into the stressed component when loaded is not recovered upon unloading. so the output of measurement partially depends on input called Hysteresis.

01-tachometer-digital tachometer-hysteresis due to pressure of force

Range:

The physical variables that are measured between two values. One is the higher calibration value Hc and the other is Lower value Lc.

01-range - read values from 0 to 11000 rpm - bezel meter - tachometer

Span:

The algebraic difference between higher calibration values to lower calibration values.

Resolution:

The minimum value of the input signal is required to cause an appreciable change in the output known as resolution.

Dead Zone:

It is the largest change in the physical variable to which the measuring instrument does not respond.

Threshold:

The minimum value of input signal that is required to make a change or start from zero.

01-threshold-minimum input given to start the engine-bike kick start action

Backlash:

The maximum distance through which one part of the instrument is moved without disturbing the other part.

01-backlash - continuous rotation possible without applying brake-SINGLE 3-PHASE AC ASYNCHRONOUS ELECTRIC MOTOR

Response Time:

The time at which the instrument begins its response for a change in the measured quantity.

Repeatability:

The ability of the measuring instrument to repeat the same results during the act measurements for the same quantity is known as repeatability.

Bias:

It is a characteristic of a measure or measuring instruments to give indications of the value of a measured quantity for which the average value differs from true value.

Magnification:

It means the magnitude of output signal of measuring instrument many times increases to make it more readable.

01-magnification-objective lens-magnify-loupe-ring

Drift:

If an instrument does not reproduce the same reading at different times of measurement for the same input signal, it is said to be measurement drift.

Reproducibility:

It is the consistency of pattern of variation in measurement. When individual measurements are carried out the closeness of the agreement between the results of measurements of the same quantity.

Uncertainty:

The range about the measured value within the true value of the measured quantity is likely to lie at the stated level of confidence.

Traceability:

It is nothing establishing a calibration by step by step comparison with better standards.

01-traceability-calibration step by step-vacuum calibration

Parallax:

An apparent change in the position of the index relative is to the scale marks.

 

 

01-parallax-error-measurement of length-eye view

PRODUCE ELECTRICITY FROM SOLAR HEAT

August 22, 2011

01-solar thermal power conversion-beam radiation-direct normal irradiation-Solar-Power-in-Florida-turning solar heat into electricity

The principles of solar thermal power conversion have been known for more than a century; its commercial scale-up and exploitation, however, has only taken place since the mid 1980s. With these first large-scale 30-80 MW parabolic trough power stations, built in the California Mojave desert, the technology has impressively demonstrated its technological and economic promise. With few adverse environmental impacts and a massive resource, the sun, it offers an opportunity to the countries in the sun belt of the world comparable to that currently being offered by offshore wind farms to European and other nations with the windiest shorelines.

01-direct radiation-solar radiation-electromagnetic radiation-solar collectors-insolation

Solar thermal power can only use direct sunlight, called ‘beam radiation’ or Direct Normal Irradiation (DNI), i.e. that fraction of sunlight which is not deviated by clouds, fumes or dust in the atmosphere and that reaches the earth’s surface in parallel beams for concentration. Hence, it must be sited in regions with high direct solar radiation. Suitable sites should receive at least 2,000 kilowatt hours (kWh) of sunlight radiation per m2annually, whilst best site locations receive more than 2,800 kWh/m2/year.

01-solar panels-solar power energy-solar power system-diagram_solar_power-produce electricity from solar energy example

In many regions of the world, one square kilometer of land is enough to generate as much as 100-130 Giga watt hours (GWh) of solar electricity per year using solar thermal technology. This is equivalent to the annual production of a 50 MW conventional coal- or gas-fired mid-load power plants. Over the total life cycle of a solar thermal power system, its output would be equivalent to the energy contained in more than    5 million barrels of oil2).

TURNING SOLAR HEAT INTO ELECTRICITY

01-illustration_trough_collector_from_sunlight-solar collector assembly-parabolic trough solar collector

Producing electricity from the energy in the sun’s rays is a straightforward process: direct solar radiation can be concentrated and collected by a range of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies to provide medium- to high temperature heat.


01-concentrating solar power plants-CSP Technologies-Concentrating solar power technologies-direct solar radiation process-parabolic solar trough collectors

This heat is then used to operate a conventional power cycle, for example through a steam turbine or a Stirling engine. Solar heat collected during the day can also be stored in liquid or solid media such as molten salts, ceramics, concrete or, in the future, phase-changing salt mixtures. At night, it can be extracted from the storage medium thereby continuing turbine operation.